34. liu, sung by Kut (Li, Mahur) 1:05 2008/010

Sung by the oldest man known on Lihir, Kut, after hearing the Schlaginhaufen recordings.

Older people responding to these recordings generally did so with nostalgia, and it is believed that Kut chose to sing this particular song for recording to illustrate his feelings, being the only man of his generation still living. The archaic language was translated into Lihirian by Kut thus: ‘I am alone with no friends, nobody to care for me, and living in misery’.

35. kamlar, sung by Justin Sangal, John Lulbe, Martin Durie, Ben Wangole, Martin Jikelbe, Francis Cletau, Francis Go and Justin Totot (Kureng, Masahet) 1:29 2008/049

In archaic language, kamlar (or kamnar as it is known on Niolam) is a genre performed by men only. Once a secret song of the bush, this particular kamlar has now reached a point where it has become public, and can be heard and sung widely.

36. mlera, sung by Justin Sangal, John Lulbe, Martin Durie, Ben Wangole, Martin Jikelbe, Francis Cletau, Francis Go and Justin Totot (Kureng, Masahet) 1:35 2008/050

Like kamlar, mlera is also a male genre originally performed secretly, but as with the above song, this mlera is now in the public domain. Mlera is also a song of the bush: it is said that the singers of mlera would dress up with cordyline leaves around their waist and with their singing cast a powerful spell over women, who could not help but follow them.

37. pindik, sung by Wesli Weri, Julai Abiglien & friends (Sale, Niolam) 1:10 2008/169

Pindik is the name of a secret men’s society in Lihir that originated from the Namatanai district.

More generally pindik refers to something secret or confidential. In pindik, groups of men are often taught new knowledge and skills. There are songs and dances that are closely associated with pindik, and pindik is often practiced before men perform at a feast. While pindik continues today, much pindik knowledge has now been made public.

38. salsale, sung by Lucy Romrom, Anges Lopdal, Mary Timar, Agnes Tanbel, Elizabeth Luwot, Barbara Bunbun, Barbara Kaskas, Ellen Pule, Helen Wenge, Joseph Bosle, Francis Palits, Clement Siapinpin & Peter Sim (Dot, Masahet) 1:43 2008/155

Salsale is the name of another men’s dance which was once performed at feasts in enemy villages or in ‘foreign’ parts of Lihir. Men dance with spears to show their strength, while women sing as two men beat a slit drum. Salsale is still performed today. In the past the group dancing the salsale with their spears felt safe from enemies who might want to attack them.

 

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