39. bual, song 1, sung by Joseph Pilai (Matsuts, Niolam) 2008/158a 1:47

In the Lihirian language, the exact words of this bual and its partner song below cannot be translated. However, bual means pig, and the movements of the accompanying dance are said to imitate a pig. It is performed during the climax of feasting, during the daytime.

40. bual, song 2, sung by Joseph Pilai (Matsuts, Niolam)  2008/158b 1:30

 

41. apubutbut, song 1, sung by Mathew Tongia, Benjamin Rukam, John Izizip, Lawrance Bondok & Thomas Toentulat (Lisel, Niolam) 2008/110 1:05

Apubutbut are also performed during feasting. The archaic language identifies the song type, along with others in this language, as being very old forms of expression. This performance has three partner songs.

42. apubutbut, song 2, sung by Mathew Tongia, Benjamin Rukam, John Izizip, Lawrance Bondok & Thomas Toentulat (Lisel, Niolam)  2008/108 1:01

 

43. apubutbut, song 3, sung by Mathew Tongia, Benjamin Rukam, John Izizip, Lawrance Bondok & Thomas Toentulat (Lisel, Niolam)  2008/109 1:35

 

44. bel, song 1, sung by Alois Kokon (Pango, Niolam)  2008/139 0:37

Also sung in the archaic language of Lihir, bel are said to tell the story of real events. Usually they are performed by women, though are often composed by men, who can perform also perform them. They are generally part of a series – here two bel are sung in sequence.

45. bel, song 2, sung by Alois Kokon (Pango, Niolam)  2008/139 1.36

 

46. bel, sung by Simbi (Leo, Niolam) and recorded in 1908 VII W 1858 1:36

This bel is sung by Simbi, of Komat, Niolam - a woman the same age as Anap, the male singer heard on Track 1, and from the same village. It is the very same bel as performed on Track 44, one hundred years on.

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